A 50% Service Fee!?

Consider this to be a “What not to do” lesson in personal finance.

I’m usually pretty much on the ball when it comes to our finances. But recently I had a slip-up that cost us 50% in fees.

We have most of our Canadian financial assets with one financial institution, which are spread over a number of accounts. The bulk of our cash savings are sitting in a high-interest account with the bank. I’ve also had my main credit card at that bank for about 13 years.

I have never had any problems transferring money or paying off my credit card because there are no fees to worry about when moving money from one account to another within the bank.

I applied for a new credit card in January with another financial institution, however, and recently set it up to make a monthly donation to a charity. When my first bill came in, I went online, set up a new payee, and paid off my credit card… all $10.00 of it… from our high-interest account. I checked my new card a few days later to confirm that the payment went through, and thought nothing more about it.

Last week I was going over my April transactions and noticed that right after my $10.00 credit card payment, there was a $5.00 service fee for a payment to an outside account.

Ouch!

Okay, I admit that 50% sounds worse than $5.00,  but it’s still a hard pill to swallow.

On one hand, I want to leave it as-is, as a bit of self-punishment; a 50% stupidity fee, of sort (I long ago read and knew about the fee, I had simply forgotten). More likely, however, I will call the bank and ask them to reverse the charge.

Hopefully they will allow me to leverage my very long history with them against my very recent stupidity.

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3 responses to “A 50% Service Fee!?

  1. I guess it doesn’t hurt to ask, but yeah, those fees can sometimes be very annoying even if they are our own fault!

  2. During university I worked a couple summers as a salesman. I followed that with a couple years as a Concierge at an upscale inn. Both positions taught me that it never hurts to ask.

    The worst possible outcome is that they say “no.”

  3. Pingback: Weekend Reading: Evil Still Exists Edition | Invest It Wisely

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